Top News: #HCAI

Here are the top read news for #HCAI:


 

Ty and Carole MossA veil of secrecy shields hospitals where outbreaks occur:

The cardiac surgeon had unknowingly spread a staph infection from the rash on his hand to the hearts of at least five patients by the time Los Angeles County health investigators learned of the outbreak. Read more


 

Are hospitals doing all they can to prevent C. diff infections? Not yet, new study findsAre hospitals doing all they can to prevent C. diff infections? Not yet, new study finds:

Nearly half of American hospitals aren’t taking key steps to prevent a kind of gut infection that kills nearly 30,000 people annually and sickens hundreds of thousands more – despite strong evidence that such steps work, according to a new study. Read more


 

Enterococcus faecium bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, including penicillin and vancomycin, have become increasingly common in hospitals. It can cause surgical wound infections, endocarditis and urinary tract infections.Designing a Hospital to Better Fight Infection:

In a new approach to reducing the scourge of hospital-acquired infections, a team of scientists has been testing thousands of microbe samples from a Chicago hospital to learn how a medical building might make patients sicker. Read more


 

Device-Associated Infections: Evidence-based Practice Remains the Best Way to Decrease HAIs:

It is estimated that U.S. healthcare institutions spend $9.8 billion annually treating healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) rank among the top five most expensive HAIs (Zimlichman, 2013). Read more


 

Collaborative relationships between nurses and physicians decrease rates of healthcare-associated infections in critical care, according to an article...Nurse-Physician Collaboration Associated With Decreased Rates of Common Healthcare-Associated Infections:

Collaborative relationships between nurses and physicians decrease rates of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in critical care, according to an article in the April issue of Critical Care Nurse (CCN). Read more


 

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