Top News: #Infections

Here are the top read news for #Infections:


_88558805_33e7d1af-cad0-4a75-a24a-3d4e8bcd5675Antibiotic-coated tubes ‘could cut child infection rates’:

Fewer children would develop infections in intensive care if the plastic tubes used to deliver drugs straight into their veins were coated in antibiotics, a study in The Lancet suggests. At present the practice is used only in adults, but researchers say it should be applied to children too: Read more

 


145701066200318 deaths may be linked to bacterial bloodstream infection:

State health officials are investigating the outbreak of a bacterial bloodstream infection in southern Wisconsin that may be a factor in 18 deaths. Health officer Karen McKeown said the infection has been detected in 44 people, with the majority over age 65. McKeown said all those infected have serious underlying health conditions. The 18 who died tested positive for Elizabethkingia, but it has not been determined if their deaths were caused by the infection, their health conditions, or both, she said: Read more

 


hospitalCDC: more effort needed to fight superbugs:

While there has been much progress in the US in protecting patients from acquiring infections in hospitals and other health care settings, more effort is required, especially to tackle superbugs – bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics.This was the message the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) put out this week in a new report that urges all health care providers to use a combination of infection control measures to better protect patients: Read more

 


 

gettyimages-150094647Wrestler with “mat herpes” virus wants state tournament postponed:

A high school wrestler who believes he contracted a highly contagious virus known as “mat herpes” during a recent tournament in Northern California wants the upcoming state championships postponed so other students don’t contract the disease: Read more

 


33351BC8CD6E416D893B08EBF3BB6DDE.ashxUrinary Tract Infection: How Bacteria Nestle In:

Almost every second woman suffers from a bladder infection at some point in her life. Also men are affected by cystitis, though less frequently. In eighty percent of the cases, it is caused by the intestinal bacterium E. coli. It travels along the urethra to the bladder where it triggers painful infections. In Nature Communications, researchers from the University of Basel and the ETH Zurich explain how this bacterium attaches to the surface of the urinary tract via a protein with a sophisticated locking technique, which prevents it from being flushed out by the urine flow: Read more

 

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