Top News: #Pregnancy

Here are the top read news for #Pregnancy:


10kleinsub-master768Opinion: Get the Epidural:

There are scarier complications — for example, you might end up needing an emergency C-section — but you might end up needing one if you try to give birth naturally. Some doctors say epidurals slow labor down, but I spoke to doctors who believe it can actually speed it up. And there is plenty of science saying epidurals are overwhelmingly safe, as well: Read more

 


sln_july19_16x9With Uptick in Home Births, Midwives Seek to Practice in More States:

Women often choose out-of-hospital births so they can deliver their babies in an intimate, familiar setting where they think their wishes for natural childbirth are more likely to be honored. Home births are most popular in rural states, where women often live at a distance from obstetric care or where midwives are more accepted by the medical community: Read more

 


2016-07-19_Thinkstock-femme-enceinte-cigarette-759x500Quitting smoking during pregnancy: beneficial for both mother and child:

Furthermore, the results indicate that the use of nicotine patches reduces the risk of premature birth and low birth weight: Read more

 

 

 


imrs.phpFears about IVF and cancer may be unfounded:

Women who undergo in vitro fertilization to have a baby have enough to worry about without fretting about a possible increase in their risk for breast cancer. This week they got good news: The biggest study of its kind found IVF didn’t increase women’s chances of developing the disease. And that was just the latest bit of reassurance about the connection — or lack of one — between cancer and IVF: Read more

 

 


istock000024243617largeThe most expensive U.S. cities to have a baby:

The cost of having a baby varies dramatically, not only nationwide but often from one hospital to another within the same city, a new report finds. The study, conducted by Castlight Health, looked at the cost of maternity care, including routine vaginal deliveries and cesarean sections, in the 30 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. The findings show that within a given city, average prices for the same services associated with childbirth vary widely: Read more

 

 

 

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