Top News: Concussions

Here are the top read news for #Concussions:


child-playing-baseballConcussion Treatment: How To Help Your Child:

While sleeping can be dangerous for someone immediately after a concussion, especially if they’re having trouble communicating, moving, or are vomiting, that risk drops off sharply as time goes on. Indeed, research has shown that more sleep following an injury helps the brain recover that much faster. Making your child stay up all night may also interfere with their doctor’s ability to accurately measure their recovery: Read more

 

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gettyimages-79007026-e1466526216885Surge in ER Visits For Injuries, Concussions From Soccer:

More than 200,000 concussions or head injuries were treated in emergency rooms, or 7 percent of injuries. The rate jumped to almost 30 per 10,000 people in 2013 from just under 2 per 10,000 players in 1990. That trend underscores a need for better safety education and injury prevention in youth soccer, said Dr. Huiyun Xiang, the lead author and a researcher at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio: Read more

 


A bicyclist rides through a snowy street during the morning rush hour in New YorkHelmets prevent severe head injuries in bike accidents:

Despite some criticism of bike helmets for not being protective enough, they do cut the risk of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) by half when riders suffer a head injury, a U.S. study suggests. Riders with helmets were also less likely to die from their injuries, and less likely to break facial bones, than those not wearing a helmet, researchers report in American Journal of Surgery: Read more

 

 


bchjp3oi67q0tq9c-fill320x160xAdults with moderate to severe TBI may be at greater risk of death from unintentional injuries:

Research examining adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) who participated in rehabilitation showed that they were twice as likely to die from an unintentional injury that occurred following their TBI. This was in comparison to individuals in rehabilitation of similar age, sex, and race but without TBI: Read more

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concussion_20160904024937583_5861325_ver1-0_640_360Concussions still a medical mystery:

We know about the concussion problem. In sports and in combat, we know taking a hit to the head isn’t healthy. But there’s still a lot we don’t know about concussions themselves. A concussion occurs when the brain impacts the skull or gets shaken around. They lead to headaches, confusion and dizziness, but concussions are sometimes called “the invisible injury” because patients don’t necessarily look hurt: Read more

 

 

 

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